IFRS 9 Financial Instruments: Impairment

IFRS 9 requires recognition of impairment losses on a forward-looking basis which means that impairment loss is recognised before the occurrence of any credit event. These are referred to as expected credit losses (‘ECL’). Impairment requirements of IFRS 9 apply to (IFRS 9.5.5.1):

  • assets measured at amortised cost
  • assets measured at FVOCI with recycling
  • loan commitments (not at FVTPL)
  • financial guarantee contracts (not at FVTPL)
  • lease receivables (IFRS 16)
  • contract assets (IFRS 15)

In contrast, impairment requirements of IFRS 9 do not apply to (IFRS 9.5.5.1):

  • assets measured at FVTPL
  • assets measured at FVOCI no recycling
  • loan commitments at FVTPL
  • financial guarantee contracts at FVTPL

IFRS 9 has three approaches to impairment which are discussed below:

  • general approach,
  • simplified approach for certain trade receivables, contract assets and lease receivables
  • specific approach for purchased or originated credit-impaired financial assets

The general IFRS 9 approach to impairment follows a three stage model (sometimes referred to as three-bucket model). It is outlined below:

Three-stage IFRS 9 impairment model.
Three-stage IFRS 9 impairment model.

As we can see, under the general approach, an entity recognises expected credit losses for all financial assets. ECL can be 12-month ECL or lifetime ECL depending on whether there was a significant increase in credit risk (IFRS 9.5.5.3).

Changes in the loss allowance are recognised in P/L as impairment gains/losses (IFRS 9.5.5.8).

See the section on measurement of ECL below that expands the points mentioned above.

To assist entities that have less sophisticated credit risk management systems, IFRS 9 introduced a simplified approach under which entities do not have to track changes in credit risk of financial assets (IFRS 9.BC5.104). Instead, lifetime ECL are recognised from the date of initial recognition (IFRS 9.5.5.15).

The simplified approach is required for trade receivables or contract assets that result from transactions that are within the scope of IFRS 15 and do not contain a significant financing component (or are accounted for under the one year practical expedient contained in IFRS 15.63). For trade receivables or contract assets that contain a significant financing component, it is the entity’s choice to apply simplified approach. Similarly, the entity can choose to apply simplified approach to lease receivables accounted for under IFRS 16 (IFRS 9.5.5.15).

The existence of significant financing component is discussed in IFRS 15. See also simplified loss rate approach (provision matrix).

IFRS 9 has a specific approach for purchased or originated credit-impaired financial assets under which an entity recognises only the cumulative changes in lifetime ECL since initial recognition of such an asset (IFRS 9.5.5.13-14). Purchased or originated credit-impaired financial asset is an asset that is credit-impaired on initial recognition (IFRS 9.Appendix A). The definition of credit impaired is discussed below.

It is important to note that an asset is not credit impaired merely because it has high credit risk at initial recognition (IFRS 9.B5.4.7).

See the section on measurement of ECL below that expands points mentioned above.

Credit loss is the difference between all contractual cash flows that are due to an entity in accordance with the contract and all the cash flows that the entity expects to receive, discounted at the original EIR or credit-adjusted EIR (IFRS 9.Appendix A).

When estimating cash flows for determination of ECL, the entity takes into account (IFRS 9.Appendix A):

  • expected life of a financial instrument
  • all contractual terms of the financial instrument (e.g. prepayment, extension, call and similar options)
  • collaterals held
  • other credit enhancements integral to the contractual terms

Lifetime ECL are ECL that result from all possible default events over the expected life of a financial instrument (IFRS 9.Appendix A). ECL is therefore the present value of the difference between (IFRS 9.B5.5.29):

(a) the contractual cash flows that are due to an entity under the contract;

and

(b) the cash flows that the entity expects to receive.

12-month ECL are a portion of lifetime ECL covered above and represent the lifetime ECL that will result if a default occurs in the 12 months after the reporting date weighted by the probability of that default occurring. The standard clarifies also that 12-month ECL are neither the lifetime ECL that an entity will incur on financial instruments that it predicts will default in the next 12 months nor the cash shortfalls that are predicted over the next 12 months (IFRS 9.B5.5.43).

This results from the fact that that 12-month ECL are weighted by the probability of default (‘PD’), for example 12-month ECL will also will recognised if PD is 10%. The example below shows lifetime ECL and 12-month ECL for a loan.

Example: illustrative calculation of lifetime ECL and 12-month ECL for a loan

On 31 December 20X1, Entity A lends Entity B $100,000. Entity B will repay the loan in 5 annual equal instalments amounting to $25,000 (i.e. $125,000 in total). Calculation of ECL will be based on PD/LGD/EAD model:

PD – probability of default (assessed by Entity A)
EAD – exposure at default (= amortised cost of the loan)
LGD – loss given default (i.e. what % of EAD will not be recovered at default, this should take into account any collaterals held)

Calculations of 12-month ECL and lifetime ECL are shown below. You can access all calculations presented in this example in an excel file.

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reporting dateEADPD (marginal)PD (cumulative)LGDEIRMarginal ECL
total6,722
20X1-12-31100,0003%3%80%7.9%2,224
20X2-12-3182,9263%6%80%7.9%1,709
20X3-12-3164,5003%9%80%7.9%1,231
20X4-12-3144,6274%13%80%7.9%1,053
20X5-12-3123,1644%17%80%7.9%506

As we can see from the table above, 12-month ECL amount to $2,224 and lifetime ECL amount to $6,722.


IFRS 9 does not give specific methodology requirements for measuring ECL, instead it provides general guidance stating that the measurement of ECL should reflect (IFRS 9.5.5.17):

(a) an unbiased and probability-weighted amount that is determined by evaluating a range of possible outcomes;

(b) the time value of money; and

(c) reasonable and supportable information that is available without undue cost or effort at the reporting date about past events, current conditions and forecasts of future economic conditions.

There are two common approaches to ECL measurement applied in practice:

  • loss rate approach
  • adjusted Basel PD/LGD/EAD approach

Under the general approach to determination of ECL outlined above, a significant increase in credit risk since initial recognition moves a financial asset out of Stage 1 and out of 12-month ECL to lifetime ECL. Therefore, determination when a significant increase in credit risk occurs is central to measurement of ECL. When making that assessment, an entity uses the change in the risk of a default occurring over the expected life of the financial instrument instead of the change in the amount of ECL. To achieve this, an entity compares the risk of a default occurring on the financial instrument as at the reporting date with the risk of a default occurring on the financial instrument as at the date of initial recognition and consider reasonable and supportable information, that is available without undue cost or effort, that is indicative of significant increases in credit risk since initial recognition (IFRS 9.5.5.9).

It is not specified what ‘significant’ precisely means for the reasons set out in basis for conclusions paragraph (IFRS 9.BC5.171) and therefore entities need to exercise judgement and develop their own criteria. It is clarified that that a significant increase in credit risk is an event that happens before a financial asset becomes credit-impaired or an actual default occurs (IFRS 9.B5.5.7).  Paragraph IFRS 9. B5.5.17 provides a list of information that may be relevant in assessing changes in credit risk.

Default is not defined in IFRS 9. Instead, it requires an entity to apply a default definition that is consistent with the definition used for internal credit risk management purposes for the relevant financial instrument and consider qualitative indicators (for example, financial covenants) when appropriate. However, IFRS 9 introduces a rebuttable presumption that default does not occur later than when a financial asset is 90 days past due unless an entity has reasonable and supportable information to demonstrate that a more lagging default criterion is more appropriate (IFRS 9.B5.5.37). The 90-day threshold is also consistent with Basel regulatory capital calculations for banks.

Many entities rely on past due information when assessing changes in credit risk, i.e. information on payments that were not made when contractually due. IFRS 9 notes that entities should use more forward-looking information where available without undue cost or effort, but otherwise past due information is also acceptable. IFRS 9 introduces also a rebuttable presumption that the credit risk on a financial asset has increased significantly since initial recognition when contractual payments are more than 30 days past due and that this is the latest point at which lifetime ECL should be recognised, even when adjusting for forward-looking information (IFRS 9.5.5.11; B5.5.19-20).

IFRS 9 notes that information on individual asset level may not be available and a collective assessment for groups of financial assets may be necessary to ensure that significant increase in credit risk is recognised on a timely manner and not only after the instrument becomes past due (IFRS 9.B5.5.1-6). Collective assessment is widely used in practice for homogeneous, individually insignificant, financial assets. This is often the only way possible to apply forward-looking ECL model.  Paragraph IFRS 9.B5.5.5 provides examples of grouping of financial assets for the purpose of impairment assessment on a collective basis.

See also Illustrative Example 5 accompanying IFRS 9 (section ‘Collective assessment’).

An entity may assume that the credit risk on a financial instrument has not increased significantly since initial recognition if the financial instrument is determined to have low credit risk at the reporting date (IFRS 9.5.5.10). Paragraphs IFRS 9.B5.5.22‒24 elaborate on when an asset can be considered to have low credit risk.

A financial asset is credit-impaired when one or more events that have a detrimental impact on the estimated future cash flows of that financial asset have occurred. Examples of such events are given in the definition of credit-impaired financial assets given in Appendix A to IFRS 9. Measurement of interest income on credit-impaired financial assets is covered in a separate section.

Loss rate approach is most suitable for non-financial entities as it does not require sophisticated credit risk management systems in place. Under a loss rate approach, lifetime ECL are calculated using a provision matrix which can be constructed using the following steps:

  • receivables are segmented based on different credit loss patterns (e.g. based on customer type, product type, geographical region, collateral etc.)
  • ageing of receivables is prepared (e.g. not past due, past due 1-30 days, 31-60 days, 90+ days)
  • historical loss patterns are calculated and treated as a starting point is estimating loss rate
  • historical data is adjusted to take into account reasonable and supportable information that is available without undue cost or effort at the reporting date about current conditions and forecasts of future economic conditions

Provision matrix is specifically referred to in paragraph IFRS 9.B5.5.35 and Example 12 (IFRS 9.IE74-77) as an example of simplified approach to ECL measurement for trade receivables, contract assets and lease receivables. See also basis for conclusions in paragraph IFRS 9.BC5.225.

Example: lifetime ECL for trade receivables using a provision matrix

Entity A is a service provider and has 2 types of customers: individual customers (B2C) and business customers (B2B). Entity A believes that B2C / B2B segmentation best reflects credit loss patterns. Sales are usually made on credit, therefore Entity A has a significant balance of trade receivables outstanding at each reporting date. As there is no significant financing component, Entity A recognises lifetime ECL for all its trade receivables.

For the purpose of this example, loss rate is calculated based on sales made in January of a given year. In real life, the loss rate should be based on data from several months, but it cannot be too old as it may yield outdated results. The illustrative calculation of loss rate for B2C customers is presented below.

You can access all calculations presented in this example in an excel file.

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

paymentspaymentsreceivables
outstanding
receivables
ageing
loss rate
sales in January100,000not overdue2%
paid on time50,00050,000overdue 1-30 days4%
paid 1-30 days
after due date
27,00023,000overdue 31-60 days9%
paid 31-60 days
after due date
15,0008,000overdue 61-90 days25%
paid 61-90 days
after due date
6,0002,000overdue 91+ days
(not paid at all)
100%

Additionally, Entity A analysed forward-looking information (GDP forecasts, changes in unemployment rate, changes in law) and concluded that there is no indication that the above historical loss rate should be adjusted (see IFRS 9.B5.5.52-53).

As at 31 December 20X1, Entity A prepared ageing of its trade receivables from B2C customers and calculated lifetime ECL as presented in the following table.

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amountageingloss rateECL allowance
total ECL allowance27,567
300,000not overdue2%6,000
140,000overdue 1-30 days4%5,600
60,000overdue 31-60 days9%5,217
23,000overdue 61-90 days25%5,750
5,000overdue 91+ days100%5,000


Financial institutions most often use Basel PD/LGD/EAD approach as a starting point which is then adjusted to meet IFRS 9 requirements. A simplified illustration is presented in this example.

Discussion on what is meant by reasonable and supportable information, and how historical information can be used, is contained in paragraphs IFRS 9.B5.5.49-54.

As noted earlier, ECL should reflect an unbiased and probability-weighted amount that is determined by evaluating a range of possible outcomes (IFRS 9.5.5.17). This means that a ECL allowance will be recognised for a financial asset even if the most likely scenario is that there will be no credit loss at all (IFRS 9.B5.5.41). IFRS 9 helpfully clarifies that in practice, this exercise may not need to be a complex analysis. In some cases, relatively simple modelling may be sufficient, without the need for a large number of detailed simulations of scenarios. For example, the average credit losses of a large group of financial instruments with shared risk characteristics may be a reasonable estimate of the probability-weighted amount. In other situations, the identification of scenarios that specify the amount and timing of the cash flows for particular outcomes and the estimated probability of those outcomes will probably be needed. In those situations, the expected credit losses should reflect at least two outcomes in accordance with paragraph IFRS 9.5.5.18 (IFRS 9.B5.5.42).

The clarification cited above helps to keep things simple because strict reading of paragraph IFRS 9.5.5.17 could have led to developing multiple scenarios. For example, a bank with mortgage credit exposures could start predicting doomsday scenarios, e.g. economic downturn when people lose jobs and house prices go down. More discussion on this subject can be found in Meeting Summary (11 December 2015) of Transition Resource Group for Impairment of Financial Instruments (agenda item ‘Incorporation of forward-looking scenarios’).

For trade receivables, contract assets and lease receivables accounted for using a simplified approach, it is accepted that a simple provision matrix will be enough.

The maximum period to consider when measuring ECL is the maximum contractual period (including extension options) over which the entity is exposed to credit risk and not a longer period, even if that longer period is consistent with business practice (IFRS 9.5.5.19). This means that the measurement horizon of ECL should not go beyond the point where further extension options are at the discretion of the lender, but should take into account extension and prepayment options at the discretion of the borrower.

ECL should be discounted to the reporting date (IFRS 9.B5.5.44). ECL consider the amount and timing of payments, therefore a credit loss arises even if the entity expects to be paid in full but later than when contractually due (IFRS 9.B5.5.28).

The discount rate for calculating ECL should be as follows (IFRS 9.B5.5.44):

  • for fixed rate assets, the EIR determined at initial recognition or an approximation thereof should be used
  • for variable interest rate assets, the current EIR should be used

The ‘approximation’ of EIR above is most likely intended to be a practical relief for banks that makes it easier for them to reconcile IFRS 9 with Basel models which cover only the time value of money between default event and subsequent recoveries (e.g. sale of collateral).

For trade receivables, contract assets and lease receivables accounted for using a simplified approach, it is accepted that a simple provision matrix will be enough.

Collateral and credit enhancements should be taken into account when measuring ECL (IFRS 9.B5.5.55). IFRS 9 does not specify how to measure the proceeds from collateral, but fair value seems the only reasonable option.

Sale of a defaulted receivable can and should be taken into account when measuring ECL. This matter is not specifically addressed in IFRS 9, but it was discussed at the December 2015 meeting of Transition Resource Group for Impairment of Financial Instruments (agenda item ‘Inclusion of cash flows expected from the sale on default of a loan in the measurement of expected credit losses’). ITG noted that cash flows expected from the sale on default of a loan should be included in the measurement of expected credit losses if:

(a) selling the loan is one of the recovery methods that the entity expected to pursue in a default scenario;

(b) the entity is neither legally nor practically prevented from realising the loan using that recovery method; and

(c) the entity has reasonable and supportable information upon which to base its expectations and assumptions.

The inclusion of recovery sales proceeds in the measurement of ECL is appropriate for assets in all three stages of the ECL model.

In 2015 the Basel Committee issued Guidance on Credit Risk and Accounting for Expected Credit Losses which is aimed and supplementing and expanding ECL IFRS 9 model for largest banks. This guidance focuses on systems and control environment, but contains also additional guidance on ECL models for banks.

IFRS 9 follows a ‘decoupled’ approach to ECL and interest revenue under which interest is recognised on the gross carrying amount, i.e. without taking ECL into account. An exception to this rule relates to assets that become credit-impaired or are credit-impaired on initial recognition (IFRS 9.5.4.1; BC5.72).

Definition of credit-impaired assets is covered in a separate section.

For purchased or originated credit-impaired financial assets, interest is calculated using credit-adjusted EIR. This means that initial ECL are included in the estimated cash flows when calculating EIR (IFRS 9.5.4.1(a); B5.4.7). See the example below.

Example: purchased credit-impaired financial asset and credit adjusted EIR

On 1 January 20X1, Entity X issues a bond with a face value of $10,000 and a fixed annual coupon of $600 (i.e. 6%) payable on 31 December each year until maturity date, which is 31 December 20X6. In 20X2, Entity X run into financial difficulties and did not pay the coupon due on 31 December 20X2 which resulted in significant reduction in market prices of this bond. On 1 January 20X3, Entity A acquires this bond for $5,000 as it believes that Entity X will be able to partially repay the face value on redemption date. Entity A expects to receive $8,000 on 31 December 20X6, but it does not expect to receive any coupon payments.

You can access all the calculations presented in this example in an excel file.

On 1 January 20X3, Entity A calculates credit adjusted EIR based on expected cash flows that include initial ECL:

DateCash flow
credit adjusted EIR12.5%
20X3-01-01(5,000)
20X3-12-31-
20X4-12-31-
20X5-12-31-
20X6-12-318,000

Note that EIR based on contractual cash flows would amount to 33.3%:

DateCash flow
contractual EIR33.3%
20X3-01-01(5,000)
20X3-01-01600*
20X3-12-31600
20X4-12-31600
20X5-12-31600
20X6-12-3110,600

* past due coupon

The accounting scheme for the bond using the credit adjusted EIR is as follows:

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yearopening balance
1 Jan
interest in P/Lcash flowclosing balance
31 Dec
20X35,000623-5,623
20X45,623701-6,325
20X56,325789-7,113
20X67,113887(8,000)-

Let’s now assume that on 1 January 20X6 Entity A revises its estimates and expects to receive $8,500 which it finally receives on 31 December 20X6. On 1 January 20X6, $8,500 to be received on 31 December 20X6 and discounted using the original credit-adjusted EIR has a present value of $7,558. Under the original accounting schedule presented above, the bond has a carrying value of $7,113 on 1 January 20X6. Therefore, Entity A recognises an impairment gain amounting to $445. The accounting schedule for this bond is updated as follows:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

yearopening balance
1 Jan
impairment gaininterest in P/Lcash flowclosing balance
31 Dec
20X35,000-623-5,623
20X45,623-701-6,325
20X56,325-789-7,113
20X67,113445942(8,500)-


For financial assets that are not purchased or originated credit-impaired financial assets, but subsequently have become credit-impaired financial assets (stage 3 in the general ECL model), interest is recognised by application of original EIR to amortised cost of the asset, i.e. after deducting ECL from the gross amount. See the example below:

Example: asset that has become credit-impaired after initial recognition

On 1 January 20X1, Entity A lends $1 million to Entity B and Entity B needs to repay the loan on 31 December 20X4 by paying $1.5 million. There are no payments required between these dates, which gives the effective interest rate (EIR) at 10.7%. Entity A estimates the 12-month ECL at initial recognition at $20,000.

On 1 January 20X2, the financial situation of Entity B deteriorates significantly and Entity A considers its loan to Entity B as credit-impaired (stage 3). It now estimates to receive only $0.5 million on 31 December 20X4 (the same repayment date). The estimated credit loss (ECL) at repayment date is therefore $1 million which, discounted using the original EIR of 10.7%, gives a present value of ECL at $737,788 as of 1 January 20X2. The accounting schedule for this bond is presented below.

All calculations presented in this example are available for download in excel file.

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

 1 January1 January1 JanuaryInterest in P/LInterest in P/LInterest in P/LImpairment in
P/L (expense)
Cash flow31 December31 December31 December
total235,654(735,654)
yearGross carrying
amount
ECL allowanceAmortised costInterest on loanUnwinding of
ECL discount
Total interest
in P/L
Gross carrying
amount
ECL allowanceAmortised cost
20X11,000,000(20,000)980,000106,682(2,134)104,548(20,000)-1,106,682(22,134)1,084,548
20X21,106,682(737,788)368,894118,063(78,709)39,354(715,654)-1,224,745(816,497)408,248
20X31,224,745(816,497)408,248130,658(87,105)43,553--1,355,403(903,602)451,801
20X41,355,403(903,602)451,801144,597(96,398)48,199-(500,000)---

As a result, Entity A recognised $235,654 of interest income in total and $735,654 of credit losses in P/L, which gives a net loss of $500,000.

When a financial asset is paid in full or no longer credit-impaired (‘cured’), the difference between

(a) the interest that would be calculated by applying the effective interest rate to the gross carrying amount of the credit-impaired financial asset and

(b) the interest recognised by applying the effective interest rate to amortised cost of the asset, i.e. after deducting ECL from the gross amount

is recognised as a reversal of impairment loss. This approach may result in net reversal if impairment losses recognised on a given asset to date. See relevant IFRIC page on this matter (IFRIC Update March 2019).


As a rule, ECL should be recognised for loan commitments and financial guarantee contracts that are not measured at FVTPL. The date that the entity becomes a party to the irrevocable commitment should be considered to be the date of initial recognition for the purposes of applying the IFRS 9 impairment requirements (IFRS 9.5.5.6).

For a financial guarantee contract, the entity is required to make payments only in the event of a default by the debtor in accordance with the terms of the instrument that is guaranteed. Accordingly, cash shortfalls for the purpose of ECL measurement are the expected payments to reimburse the holder for a credit loss that it incurs less any amounts that the entity expects to receive from the holder, the debtor or any other party. If the asset is fully guaranteed, the estimation of cash shortfalls for a financial guarantee contract would be consistent with the estimations of cash shortfalls for the asset subject to the guarantee (IFRS 9.B5.5.32).

ECL on loan commitments should be discounted using the EIR, or its approximation, that will be applied when recognising the financial asset resulting from the loan commitment. ECL on financial guarantee contracts, or on loan commitments for which the EIR cannot be determined, are discounted by applying a discount rate that reflects the current market assessment of the time value of money and the risks that are specific to the cash flows but only if, and to the extent that, the risks are taken into account by adjusting the discount rate instead of adjusting the cash shortfalls being discounted (IFRS 9.B5.5.47-48).

IFRS 9 includes a specific exception regarding time horizon for ECL measurement for revolving credit facilities that do not have a fixed term or repayment structure and usually have a short contractual cancellation period. For such financial instruments, ECL are measured over the period that the entity is exposed to credit risk even if that period extends beyond the maximum contractual period (IFRS 9.5.5.20;B5.5.39-40). See also Example 10 accompanying IFRS 9.

For the purpose of applying the impairment requirements of IFRS 9, a financial asset that is recognised following a draw down on a loan commitment should be treated as a continuation of that commitment instead of as a new financial instrument. The ECL on the financial asset should therefore be measured considering the initial credit risk of the loan commitment from the date that the entity became a party to the irrevocable commitment (IFRS 9.B5.5.47).

The definition of amortised cost in Appendix A to IFRS 9 makes it clear that a loss allowance reduces amortised cost of an asset, it is therefore not presented as a liability.

ECL are recognised also for assets carried at FVOCI, but the loss allowance does not reduce the carrying amount of the asset below its fair value in the statement of financial position. Instead, recognition of ECL impacts P/L and the FV through OCI is recognised after taking ECL into account (IFRS 9.5.5.2). Example of journal entries is provided in Example 13 accompanying IFRS 9.

The part of loss allowance that relates to undrawn loan commitments, or to financial guarantees, is presented as a provision as there is no asset that the loss allowance could be credited against. However, if a financial instrument includes both a financial asset and an undrawn commitment component and the entity cannot identify the ECL on those components separately, ECL on the loan commitment should be recognised together with the loss allowance for the financial asset. To the extent that the combined ECL exceed the gross carrying amount of the financial asset, they should be presented as a provision (IFRS 7.B8E).

IFRS 9 exposure draft included a requirement that all write-offs must go through the use of loss allowance and therefore direct write-offs against the contractual amount of financial assets without using an allowance account were prohibited (IFRS 9 ED 2009/12 par.B29). Final version of IFRS 9 does not contain any such requirement but it seems that the approach set out in exposure draft makes the most sense.  The significance of this distinction is that impairment losses are required to be presented in a separate line in P/L (IAS 1.82(ba)) and IFRS 7 requires a reconciliation from the opening balance to the closing balance of the loss allowance (IFRS 7.35H).

Disclosure requirements relating to impairment and credit risk in general are contained in paragraphs IFRS 7.35A-38.

See other pages relating to IFRS 9:

IFRS 9 Financial Instruments: Scope and Initial Recognition

IFRS 9 Financial Instruments: Classification of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities

IFRS 9 Financial Instruments: Derivatives and Embedded Derivatives: Definitions and Characteristics

IFRS 9 Financial Instruments: Measurement

IFRS 9 Financial Instruments: Derecognition of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities

IFRS 9 Financial Instruments: Hedge Accounting

 


© 2018-2019 Marek Muc

Excerpts from IFRS Standards come from the Official Journal of the European Union (© European Union, https://eur-lex.europa.eu). The information provided on this website does not constitute professional advice and should not be used as a substitute for consultation with a certified accountant.