IFRS 16: Recognition and Measurement of Leases

At the commencement date, a lessee (a customer) recognises a right-of-use asset and a lease liability (IFRS 16.22). A right-of-use asset is an asset representing lessee’s right to use the leased asset during the lease term.

The right-of-use asset is measured at cost at the commencement date. The cost of the right-of-use asset comprises (IFRS 16.24):

(a) the amount equal to the lease liability at its initial recognition,

(b) lease payments made at or before the commencement of the lease (less any lease incentives received);

(c) any initial direct costs incurred by the lessee; and

(d) an estimate of costs to be incurred by the lessee in dismantling and removing the underlying asset, restoring the site on which it is located or restoring the underlying asset to the condition required by the terms and conditions of the lease, unless those costs are incurred to produce inventories (recognised under IAS 37).

Example: initial measurement of the right-of-use asset and lease liability

Let’s work through a calculation example on initial measurement of a lease based on the following assumptions:

Commencement date: 20X1-01-01
Discount rate: 5%
Initial direct costs: $20,000
Lease incentives: $5,000
Upfront lease payment for year 20X1: $50,000

I highly recommend to see all the calculations presented in this example in an excel file available for download.

Future payments for the lease are listed in the table below. For each payment, the discount factor is calculated in order to determine the total present value of the lease liability. Initial measurement of a lease liability amounts to $355,391 and is calculated as follows:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

paymentdate of
payment
discount
factor
discounted
amount
total:355,391
50,00020X2-01-010.952447,619
50,00020X3-01-010.907045,351
50,00020X4-01-010.863843,192
50,00020X5-01-010.822741,135
50,00020X6-01-010.783539,176
50,00020X7-01-010.746237,311
50,00020X8-01-010.710735,534
50,00020X9-01-010.676833,842
50,00020Y0-01-010.644632,230

The right-of-use asset at initial recognition amounts to $420,391:

420,391Total: right-of-use asset
355,391Initial measurement of the lease liability
20,000Initial direct costs
(5,000)Lease incentives
50,000Upfront lease payment for year 20X1

The schedules for accounting in subsequent years for the lease liability and right-of-use asset are presented below.

Lease liability increases every year due to unwinding of discount (charged as finance costs in P/L) and decreases with each payment made:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

yearopening
(1 Jan)
payment
(1 Jan)
discountclosing
(31 Dec)
20X1355,391-17,770373,161
20X2373,161(50,000)16,158339,319
20X3339,319(50,000)14,466303,785
20X4303,785(50,000)12,689266,474
20X5266,474(50,000)10,824227,298
20X6227,298(50,000)8,865186,162
20X7186,162(50,000)6,808142,971
20X8142,971(50,000)4,64997,619
20X997,619(50,000)2,38150,000
20Y050,000(50,000)--

The carrying amount of the right-of-use asset decreases with depreciation charged each year:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

yearNBV opening
(1 Jan)
depreciationNBV closing
(31 Dec)
20X1420,391(42,039)378,352
20X2378,352(42,039)336,313
20X3336,313(42,039)294,274
20X4294,274(42,039)252,235
20X5252,235(42,039)210,196
20X6210,196(42,039)168,156
20X7168,156(42,039)126,117
20X8126,117(42,039)84,078
20X984,078(42,039)42,039
20Y042,039(42,039)-

As we can see, total lease payments amount to $515,000 (this includes initial direct costs, lease incentives and upfront lease payment for year 20X1). Total expense recognised during the lease term amounts to $515,000 as well and is split between depreciation expense ($420,391) and discounting expense ($94,609).

I’ve prepared also a variation of this example that shows how to measure a lease with quarterly payments – see this excel file.


Example: rent-free period

It sometimes happens that a lease starts with a rent-free period. The way that the requirements of IFRS 16 are set out results in depreciation and interest charges being spread throughout the lease period (including rent-free periods) without any manual adjustments to general recognition model. Below is an example for a 2-year lease that starts on 20X1-01-01 with a rent of $30,000 paid quarterly up-front, but where the first two quarters are rent-free. The discount rate in this example is 4%. See the previous example for more detailed explanations on how to account for a lease.

As usual, we start with laying out all lease payments:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

quarterpaymentdate of
payment
discount
factor
discounted
amount
total:172,272
1020X1-01-011.00000
2020X1-04-010.99040
330,00020X1-07-010.980729,422
430,00020X1-10-010.971129,133
530,00020X2-01-010.961528,846
630,00020X2-04-010.952328,569
730,00020X2-07-010.943028,291
830,00020X2-10-010.933728,012

In this example, let’s assume that there are no initial direct costs or lease incentives received, therefore the right-of-use asset at initial recognition equals the initial measurement of the lease liability and amounts to $172,272.

The subsequent accounting is the same as for lease without rent-free periods. The right-of-use asset is depreciated every year and the interest expense is accrued on lease liability. The only difference to a lease without any rent-free periods relates to repayments of lease liability, because there are none during the first two quarters. Therefore, the carrying amount of lease liability increases during these periods due to accrued interest (discount).

This is how the subsequent accounting for a lease liability looks like:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

quarteropeningpaymentdiscountclosing
1172,272-1,674173,946
2173,946-1,709175,656
3175,656(30,000)1,447147,103
4147,103(30,000)1,163118,266
5118,266(30,000)85889,124
689,124(30,000)58159,705
759,705(30,000)29530,000
830,000(30,000)--

The carrying amount of the right-of-use asset decreases with depreciation charged each year as usual:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

quarter (Q)NBV openingdepreciationNBV closing
1172,272(21,534)150,738
2150,738(21,534)129,204
3129,204(21,534)107,670
4107,670(21,534)86,136
586,136(21,534)64,602
664,602(21,534)43,068
743,068(21,534)21,534
821,534(21,534)-

See this excel file for calculations.


Initial direct costs are incremental costs of obtaining a lease that would not have been incurred if the lease had not been obtained (IFRS 16.Appendix A). Examples of such costs are commissions to agents that arranged a lease.

The definition of initial direct costs is essentially the same as for incremental costs of obtaining a contract in IFRS 15.

Lease payments made at or before the commencement date are obviously not included in the lease liability, but they are included in the measurement of the right-of-use assets.

Lease incentives are payments made by a lessor (supplier) to a lessee (customer) associated with a lease, or the reimbursement by a lessor of costs of a lessee (IFRS 16. Appendix A). Lease incentives are accounted for as a reduction of the right-of-use asset.

Recently, IASB decided to amend Illustrative Example 13 to IFRS 16 which said that the reimbursements of leasehold improvements are not lease incentives as they relate to an asset recognised under IAS 16. IASB stated that it cannot be automatically assumed that all reimbursements of leasehold improvements are not lease incentives.

If such payments economically represent reimbursement for improvements made to the lessor’s asset, then yes – they are not lease incentives. Factors indicating that leasehold improvements are made to the lessor’s asset include:

  • leasehold improvements would be necessary to use the leased asset by most entities (e.g. installing walls in a building),
  • assets constructed in the leasehold improvement process do not result from specialised needs of the lessee,
  • economic useful life of leasehold improvements exceeds enforceable lease term.

Leasehold improvements are recognised separately under IAS 16. If the reimbursement is not treated as a lease incentive, it is treated as a reduction of their cost.

On the other hand, if the leasehold improvements are in fact an asset of the lessee, then any reimbursement made by the lessor should be treated as a lease incentive and accounted for as a reduction of the right-of-use asset recognised under IFRS 16.

The lease liability should be initially recognised and measured at the present value of the lease payments (IFRS 16.26). Lease payments comprise (IFRS 16.27):

(a) fixed payments, less any lease incentives receivable;

(b) variable lease payments that depend on an index or a rate,

(c) amounts expected to be payable by the lessee under residual value guarantees;

(d) the exercise price of a purchase option if the lessee is reasonably certain to exercise that option; and

(e) payments of penalties for terminating the lease, if the lease term reflects the lessee exercising an option to terminate the lease.

You can find the example on initial measurement of the right-of-use asset and lease liability a few sections earlier. See also Example 13 accompanying IFRS 16.

Fixed payments are payments made by a lessee to a lessor for the right to use an underlying asset during the lease term, excluding variable lease payments (IFRS 16. Appendix A).

Fixed payments include also payments that may, in form, contain variability but that, in substance, are unavoidable. Such payments are called ‘in-substance fixed lease payments’ and are discussed further in paragraph IFRS 16.B42.

Variable lease payments are the portion of payments made by a lessee to a lessor during the lease term that varies because of changes in facts or circumstances occurring after the commencement date, other than the passage of time (IFRS 16.appendix A). It is important to note that not all variable fixed payments are included in the measurement of lease liability and right-of-use asset. The initial (and subsequent) measurement includes only those variable payments that depend on an index or a rate. Such payments may be linked to predetermined index (e.g. CPI), benchmark rate (e.g. LIBOR) or may vary to reflect changes in market rental rates (IFRS 16.28).

For initial recognition of the lease liability, variable lease payments are measured using the actual value of an index or a rate as at the commencement date (IFRS 16.27(b)). In other words, lessee cannot use forward rates or forecasting techniques in measuring variable lease payments (IFRS 16.BC166).

Variable payments that depend on future activity of a lessee or an underlying asset are not included in the measurement of lease liability and right-of-use asset, they are recognised in P/L (or capitalised in the cost of another asset) in the period in which the event or condition that triggers those payments occurs (IFRS 16.38(b)). Typical example of such payments recognised in P/L concerns payments that depend on performance of the underlying asset (e.g. specified % of revenue or payments for the specified units relating to future usage). See also paragraphs IFRS 16.BC168-BC169 for more discussion and example 14 accompanying IFRS 16.

As stated in paragraph IFRS 16.B42(a)(ii), in substance fixed payments are also payments that are initially structured as variable lease payments linked to the use of the underlying asset but for which the variability will be resolved at some point after the commencement date so that the payments become fixed for the remainder of the lease term. Those payments become in-substance fixed payments when the variability is resolved and recognised in the lease liability and right-of-use asset.

Residual value guarantee is a guarantee made to a lessor (supplier) that the value (or part of the value) of an underlying asset at the end of a lease will be at least a specified amount. Amounts expected (estimated) to be payable by the lessee under residual value guarantees are included in the initial measurement of a lease liability (IFRS 16.27(c)).

The exercise price of a purchase option is included in the initial measurement of a lease liability if the lessee (customer) is reasonably certain to exercise that option. When considering whether a lessee is reasonably certain to exercise that option, the same criteria as for assessing lease term should be used.

Payments relating to non-lease components are excluded from the measurement of lease liability, unless the lessee applies this practical expedient.

When measuring lease liability, lease payments are discounted using the interest rate implicit in the lease, if that rate can be readily determined. IFRS 16 does not explain what is meant by ‘readily determined’, a possible approach would be to treat a rate readily determinable if there is no need to make significant estimates or assumptions. It is rare that a rate implicit in the lease can be readily determined by a lessee (customer), because such a rate is affected by factors known only to lessors (e.g. initial direct costs of the lessor or unguaranteed residual value). Moreover, interest rate implicit in the lease is not the same as the rate stated in a lease contract. Therefore, lessees (customers) usually use their incremental borrowing rates, as allowed by paragraph IFRS 16.26.

Interest rate implicit in the lease is a rate that causes the present value of (a) the lease payments and (b) the unguaranteed residual value to equal the sum of (i) the fair value of the underlying asset and (ii) any initial direct costs of the lessor (IFRS 16. Appendix A).

Unguaranteed residual value is that portion of the residual value of the underlying asset, the realisation of which by a lessor is not assured or is guaranteed solely by a party related to the lessor (IFRS 16. Appendix A).

As noted earlier, it is rare that an interest rate implicit in the lease can readily be determined by a lessee and an incremental borrowing rate is used by lessees.

See an example of calculation of an interest rate implicit in the lease in the lessor accounting part of IFRS 16.

Lessee’s incremental borrowing rate is the rate of interest that a lessee (customer) would have to pay to borrow over a similar term, and with a similar security, the funds necessary to obtain an asset of a similar value to the right-of-use asset in a similar economic environment (IFRS 16.Appendix A). An observable rate is most often used as a starting point in determining incremental borrowing rate (IFRS 16.BC162). Such an observable rate can be, for example, an actual borrowing rate of an entity, or a property yield for the property leases. Entities may also use their cost of debt.

Such an observable rate must be then adjusted to reflect maturity profile of a lease and type of asset being leased.

When a subsidiary uses financing centralised by a parent, an actual borrowing rate should be adjusted to reflect differences in credit rating of these entities.

For lease payments denominated in a foreign currency, the discount rate for that foreign currency should be used.

The right-of-use asset is measured subsequently at cost, unless the lessee applies the fair value model in IAS 40 or revaluation model in IAS 16 (IFRS 16.29).

Under the cost model, a right-of-use asset is measured initially at cost (discussed above) less any depreciation and any accumulated impairment losses (IFRS 16.30). Additionally, the cost is subsequently adjusted for any remeasurement of the lease liability resulting from reassessments or lease modifications.

The right-of-use asset is depreciated under IAS 16 requirements (IFRS 16.31). The depreciation period of the right-of-use should not exceed the lease term, unless the lease contract transfers ownership of the underlying asset to the customer (lessee) by the end of the lease term or if the cost of the right-of-use asset reflects that the lessee will exercise a purchase option (IFRS 16.32).

Right-of-use assets are subject to impairment under IAS 36. Most often, right-of-use assets are a part of a CGU and therefore are not tested for impairment individually. For more details, see this great publication by EY.

If a lessee applies fair value model to its investment properties, the same accounting should be applied to right-of-use assets that meet the definition of investment property in IAS 40 (IFRS 16.34).
If a lessee applies a revaluation model to PP&E under IAS 16, it may elect to apply this model to all of the right-of-use assets that relate to the same class of PP&E (IFRS 16.35).

After the initial recognition, the measurement of a lease liability is affected by (IFRS 16.36):

(a) accruing interest on the lease liability;

(b) lease payments made; and

(c) remeasurements reflecting any reassessment or lease modifications.

Lease liabilities are measured on an amortised cost basis using an effective interest method, similarly to other financial liabilities (IFRS 16.37). See an example.

Interest is recognised in P/L unless it can be capitalised under IAS 23.

Lease payments reduce the carrying amount of the lease liability.

Variable lease payments not included in the measurement of the lease liability are recognised in P/L in the period in which the event or condition that triggers those payments occurs (see more discussion on variable lease payments).

Remeasurements of the lease liability are treated as adjustments to the right-of-use asset. If the carrying amount is reduced to zero, any further reduction is recognised immediately in P/L (IFRS 16.39).

The lease liability is remeasured when (IFRS 16.40,42):

  • there is a change in the assessment of a lease term, or
  • there is a change in the assessment of an option to purchase the underlying asset, or
  • there is a change in the amounts expected to be payable under a residual value guarantee, or
  • there is a change in future lease payments resulting from a change in an index or a rate used to determine those payments

The remeasurements made under (a) and (b) should be made using a revised discount rate, and under (c) and (d) using an unchanged discount rate. However, remeasurements made under (d) should be made using a revised discount rate if they are caused by a change in floating interest rates (IFRS 16.41,43).

See also remeasurements resulting from lease modifications.

Example: reassessment of the lease term with updated discount rate

Starting data for this example is identical as in the example on initial recognition. It will not be reproduced here, so make sure to see this example beforehand. All calculations presented below are also available for download in an excel file. Let’s now assume that the lease term is reassessed at the end of year 20X6 and extended to 31 December 20Y5 (instead of 31 December 20Y0 as originally planned). The payments for years 20Y1-20Y5 will be $55,000. The discount rate is also revised upwards from 5% to 6%.

At the reassessment date, the entity calculates the present value of lease liability as follows:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

yearpaymentdiscount
factor
discounted
amount
total378,174
20X750,0001.000050,000
20X850,0000.943447,170
20X950,0000.890044,500
20Y050,0000.839641,981
20Y155,0000.792143,565
20Y255,0000.747341,099
20Y355,0000.705038,773
20Y455,0000.665136,578
20Y555,0000.627434,508

Before the reassessment, the lease liability amounted to $186,162 (value at the end of year 20X6, see the example on initial recognition). Entity needs to recognise the increase in lease liability as follows:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

 DRCR
Right-of-use asset192,012
Lease liability192,012

As a result of the entries above, the value of right of use asset increases to $360,168 (was $168,156 at the end of year 20X6) After the reassessment, the schedules for accounting in subsequent years for the lease liability and right-of-use asset are presented below.

Lease liability:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

yearopening
(1 Jan)
paymentdiscountclosing
(31 Dec)
20X7378,174(50,000)19,690347,864
20X8347,864(50,000)17,872315,736
20X9315,736(50,000)15,944281,680
20Y0281,680(50,000)13,901245,581
20Y1245,581(55,000)11,435202,016
20Y2202,016(55,000)8,821155,837
20Y3155,837(55,000)6,050106,887
20Y4106,887(55,000)3,11355,000
20Y555,000(55,000)--

Right-of-use asset:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

yearNBV opening
(1 Jan)
depreciationNBV closing
(31 Dec)
20X7360,168(40,019)320,149
20X8320,149(40,019)280,130
20X9280,130(40,019)240,112
20Y0240,112(40,019)200,093
20Y1200,093(40,019)160,075
20Y2160,075(40,019)120,056
20Y3120,056(40,019)80,037
20Y480,037(40,019)40,019
20Y540,019(40,019)-


Reassessments of lease term are covered in a separate section.

Variable lease payments linked to an index or a rate are reassessed when there is a change in future lease payments. In other words, the adjustment is recognised only when the adjustment to lease payments takes effect (IFRS 16.BC188-BC190).

IFRS 16 does not have specific provisions on the impact of foreign currency exchange differences arising on lease liabilities. Therefore, general IAS 21 provisions apply. In particular, it means that the value of right-of-use asset cannot be adjusted by the foreign currency exchange differences arising on lease liabilities (IFRS 16.BC196-BC199).

A lease modification is a change in the scope of a lease, or the consideration for a lease, that was not part of the original terms and conditions of the lease (IFRS 16.Appendix A). Examples of lease modifications are adding or terminating the right to use one or more underlying assets or extending or shortening the contractual lease term. When a lease modification occurs, it is accounted for either as a separate lease or adjustment to an existing lease.

A lessee (customer) accounts for a lease modification as a separate lease if both the criteria are met (IFRS 16.44):

(a) the modification increases the scope of the lease by adding the right to use one or more underlying assets; and

(b) the consideration for the lease increases by an amount commensurate with the stand-alone price for the increase in scope and any appropriate adjustments to that stand-alone price to reflect the circumstances of the particular contract.

When a lease modification is treated as a separate lease, the original right-for-use asset remains unaffected. See also Example 15 accompanying IFRS 16.

When a lease modification is not accounted for as a separate lease, a lessee (customer) (IFRS 16.45):

  1. allocates the consideration in the modified contract as when separating components of a contract,
  2. determines the lease term of the modified lease,
  3. remeasures the lease liability by discounting the revised lease payments using a revised discount rate.

The above accounting is made at the effective date of the lease modification, which is the date when both parties agree to a lease modification.

When a lease modification decreases the scope of a lease (IFRS 16.46(a):

  • the right-of-use asset and lease liability are decreased to reflect partial of full termination of the lease
  • any gain or loss resulting from the above-mentioned derecognition is immediately recognised in P/L.

Example: lease modification – decrease in scope

Entity A enters into a 10-year lease for a 2,500 sq meters of office space. The annual lease payments are $50,000 payable at the end of each year. The commencement date for the lease is 20X1-01-01 and the discount rate is 6%.

All calculations presented in this example are available for download in an excel file.

Future payments for the lease are listed in the table below. For each payment, the discount factor is calculated in order to determine the total present value of the lease liability. As there were no payments at the commencement of the lease, lease liability and the right-of-use asset are equal at initial recognition and amount to $368,004 as shown below.

Calculation of lease liability and right-of-use asset:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

paymentdate of paymentdiscount factordiscounted amount
total368,004
50,00020X1-12-310.943447,170
50,00020X2-12-310.890044,500
50,00020X3-12-310.839641,981
50,00020X4-12-310.792139,605
50,00020X5-12-310.747337,363
50,00020X6-12-310.705035,248
50,00020X7-12-310.665133,253
50,00020X8-12-310.627431,371
50,00020X9-12-310.591929,595
50,00020Y0-12-310.558427,920

The schedules for accounting in subsequent years for the lease liability and right-of-use asset are presented below.

As in previous examples, lease liability increases every year due to unwinding of discount (charged as finance costs in P/L) and decreases with each payment made:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

yearopening
(1 Jan)
discountpayment
(31 Dec)
closing
(31 Dec)
20X1368,00422,080(50,000)340,085
20X2340,08520,405(50,000)310,490
20X3310,49018,629(50,000)279,119
20X4279,11916,747(50,000)245,866
20X5245,86614,752(50,000)210,618
20X6210,61812,637(50,000)173,255
20X7173,25510,395(50,000)133,651
20X8133,6518,019(50,000)91,670
20X991,6705,500(50,000)47,170
20Y047,1702,830(50,000)-

And the carrying amount of the right-of-use asset decreases with depreciation charged each year:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

yearNBV opening
(1 Jan)
depreciationNBV closing
(31 Dec)
20X1368,004(36,800)331,204
20X2331,204(36,800)294,403
20X3294,403(36,800)257,603
20X4257,603(36,800)220,803
20X5220,803(36,800)184,002
20X6184,002(36,800)147,202
20X7147,202(36,800)110,401
20X8110,401(36,800)73,601
20X973,601(36,800)36,800
20Y036,800(36,800)-

Let’s now assume that a lease modification is made on 1 January 20X6. The scope of the lease decreases by 50% so that Entity A leases only 2,500 sq m out of original 5,000 sq m. The annual payment decreases as well from $50,000 to $30,000. The discount rate is revised to 5% at the modification date. Entity A calculates a gain in P/L as follows:

$184,002: Right-of-use asset before modification
Scope modified by: 50% (2,500 sq m out of original 5,000 sq m)
$92,001: Decrease of right-of-use asset by 50%
$92,001: Right-of-use asset after scope decrease
$210,618: Lease liability before modification
Scope modified by: 50% (2,500 sq m out of original 5,000 sq m)
$105,309: Decrease of liability by 50%
$105,309: Liability after scope decrease

As a result of the above calculations, Entity A recognises $13,308 ($105,309 – $92,001) as a gain on the termination of the lease under old terms (immediate recognition in P/L).

Reminder: all calculations for this example are available in the excel file.

At the modification date, Entity A calculates lease liability corresponding to annual payments of $30,000 and revised discount rate of 5%:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

yearpaymentdate of paymentdiscount factordiscounted amount
total129,884
20X630,00020X6-12-310.952428,571
20X730,00020X7-12-310.90727,211
20X830,00020X8-12-310.863825,915
20X930,00020X9-12-310.822724,681
20Y030,00020Y0-12-310.783523,506

Accounting entries at the lease modification date (1 January 20X6) made by Entity A are as follows:

 DRCR
Right-of-use asset92,001
Lease liability105,309
Gain on termination13,308
Lease liability24,575
Right-of-use asset24,575

Note: this example is based on illustrative example 17 accompanying IFRS 16.


Example: lease modification – both increase and decrease in scope

Entity A enters into a 10-year lease for a 2,000 sq meters of office space. The annual lease payments are $100,000 payable at the end of each year. The commencement date for this lease is 20X1-01-01 and the discount rate is 6%.

All calculations presented in this example are available for download in an excel file.

Lease liability and the right-of-use asset are equal at initial recognition and amount to $736,009 as shown below.

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

paymentdate of paymentdiscount factordiscounted amount
total736,009
100,00020X1-12-310.943494,340
100,00020X2-12-310.890089,000
100,00020X3-12-310.839683,962
100,00020X4-12-310.792179,209
100,00020X5-12-310.747374,726
100,00020X6-12-310.705070,496
100,00020X7-12-310.665166,506
100,00020X8-12-310.627462,741
100,00020X9-12-310.591959,190
100,00020Y0-12-310.558455,839

The schedules for accounting in subsequent years for the lease liability and right-of-use asset are presented below.

Lease liability:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

yearopening
(1 Jan)
discountpayment
(31 Dec)
closing
(31 Dec)
20X1736,00944,161(100,000)680,169
20X2680,16940,810(100,000)620,979
20X3620,97937,259(100,000)558,238
20X4558,23833,494(100,000)491,732
20X5491,73229,504(100,000)421,236
20X6421,23625,274(100,000)346,511
20X7346,51120,791(100,000)267,301
20X8267,30116,038(100,000)183,339
20X9183,33911,000(100,000)94,340
20Y094,3405,660(100,000)-

Right-of-use asset:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

yearNBV opening
(1 Jan)
depreciationNBV closing
(31 Dec)
20X1736,009(73,601)662,408
20X2662,408(73,601)588,807
20X3588,807(73,601)515,206
20X4515,206(73,601)441,605
20X5441,605(73,601)368,004
20X6368,004(73,601)294,403
20X7294,403(73,601)220,803
20X8220,803(73,601)147,202
20X9147,202(73,601)73,601
20Y073,601(73,601)-

Let’s assume now that a lease modification is made on 1 January 20X6 as follows:

  • the scope is increased by additional 1,500 sq m
  • the lease term is shortened from 10 to 8 years
  • annual payments are increased to $150,000

The revised discount rate at the lease modification date is 7%.

Entity A determines that the increase in scope of the lease does not meet the criteria set out in paragraph IFRS 16.44 and therefore the increase in scope is not accounted for as a separate lease.

At the modification date, as a first step, Entity A calculates gain on the termination of the lease of 2,000 sq metres for years 9 and 10 as follows:

$368,004: Right-of-use asset before modification
Modified (remaining) scope: 60% (3 out of 5 remaining years)
$147,202: Decrease of right-of-use asset by 40%
$220,803: Right-of-use asset after scope decrease (remaining 60%)
$421,236: Liability before modification
$267,301: Remaining liability relating to modified scope (at original discount rate)
$153,935: Decrease of liability

As a result, Entity A recognises $6,733 ($153,935 – $147,202) as a gain on the termination of the lease under old terms (immediate recognition in P/L).

Reminder: all calculations for this example are available in the excel file.

Next, Entity A calculates the lease liability and right-of-use asset relating to the additional 1,500 sq m at $131,215.8 by discounting the additional annual payments of $50,000 at 7%:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

paymentdate of paymentdiscount factordiscounted amount
total131,215.8
50,00020X6-12-310.934646,729.0
50,00020X7-12-310.873443,671.9
50,00020X8-12-310.816340,814.9

This amount is added to the value of the right-of-use asset (all accounting entries are summarised at the end of this example).

As a final step, Entity A calculates the impact of the revised discount rate on the lease liability part that reflects the annual payments of $100,000 for years 20X6-20X8. Liability discounted at original discount rate of 6% ($267,301.2) is compared to the amount discounted at 7% ($262,431.6). The difference of $4,869.6 is deducted from the right-of-use asset and lease liability.

In summary, the following accounting entries are made by Entity A at the modification date:

1/ Gain on the termination of the lease of 2,000 sq metres for years 9 and 10 -> immediate recognition in P/L:

 DRCR
Right-of-use asset147,202
Lease liability153,935
Gain on termination6,733

2/ Impact of revised discount rate for years 6-8 on the lease of 2,000 sq metres:

 DRCR
Right-of-use asset4,870
Lease liability4,870

3/ Impact of increased leased space (additional 1,500 sq metres):

 DRCr
Right-of-use asset131,216
Lease liability131,216

Accounting for the lease liability and the right-of-use asset in the years following the modification will be as follows:

Lease liability:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

yearopening
(1 Jan)
discountpayment
(31 Dec)
closing
(31 Dec)
20X6393,64727,555(150,000)271,203
20X7271,20318,984(150,000)140,187
20X8140,1879,813(150,000)-

Right-of-use asset:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

yearNBV opening
(1 Jan)
depreciationNBV closing
(31 Dec)
20X6347,149(115,716)231,433
20X7231,433(115,716)115,716
20X8115,716(115,716)-

Note: this example is based on illustrative example 18 accompanying IFRS 16.


When a lease modification does not decrease the scope of a lease, the changes in lease liability have a corresponding impact on the right-of-use asset without any one-off recognition in P/L (IFRS 16.46(b)).

For lease modifications that increase the scope of a lease, the adjustment to the carrying amount of the right-of-use asset effectively represents the cost of the additional right of use acquired as a result of the modification. For lease modifications that change the consideration paid for a lease, the adjustment to the carrying amount of the right-of-use asset effectively represents a change in the cost of the right-of-use asset as a result of the modification. The use of a revised discount rate in remeasuring the lease liability reflects that, in modifying the lease, there is a change in the interest rate implicit in the lease (IFRS 16.BC203).

See also Examples 16 and 19 accompanying IFRS 16 and an excel example below based on Example 19 from IFRS 16.

Example: lease modification – change in consideration only

In this example, Entity A enters into a 10-year lease for office space, the starting point, assumptions and calculations for initial recognition of a lease liability and right-of-use asset at $736,009 are the same as in this example. All calculations are also available for download in an excel file.

Let’s now assume that a lease modification is made on 1 January 20X6 and both parties agree to lower annual lease payments amounting to $95,000. The lease term and lease scope remain unchanged. Entity A determines that the discount rate at the modification date increases to 7%.

Entity A calculates new present value of lease liability taking into account updated amounts of lease payments and revised discount rate:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

paymentdate of paymentdiscount factordiscounted amount
total389,518.8
95,00020X6-12-310.934688,785.0
95,00020X7-12-310.873482,976.7
95,00020X8-12-310.816377,548.3
95,00020X9-12-310.762972,475.0
95,00020Y0-12-310.713067,733.7

The amount calculated above is obviously lower that the lease liability before the modification ($421,236.4), the difference is accounted for as follows:

 DRCR
Right-of-use asset31,717.6
Lease liability31,717.6

Accounting for the lease liability and the right-of-use asset in the years following the modification will be as follows:

Lease liability:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

yearopening
(1 Jan)
discountpayment
(31 Dec)
closing
(31 Dec)
20X6389,51927,266(95,000)321,785
20X7321,78522,525(95,000)249,310
20X8249,31017,452(95,000)171,762
20X9171,76212,023(95,000)88,785
20Y088,7856,215(95,000)-

Right-of-use asset:

Note: you can scroll the table horizontally if it doesn’t fit your screen

yearNBV opening
(1 Jan)
depreciationNBV closing
(31 Dec)
20X6336,287(67,257)269,029
20X7269,029(67,257)201,772
20X8201,772(67,257)134,515
20X9134,515(67,257)67,257
20Y067,257(67,257)-

Note: this example is based on illustrative example 19 accompanying IFRS 16.


A sale and leaseback transaction is a transaction where one entity (seller-lessee) transfers an asset to another entity (buyer-lessor) and leases that asset back from the buyer-lessor (IFRS 16.98). For each sale and leaseback transaction, the seller-lessee should determine whether the transfer of an asset is a sale. This should be done by applying IFRS 15 criteria for satisfaction of performance obligations. For example, IFRS 15 states that if an entity has a call option on the asset (i.e. a right to repurchase the asset), the customer does not obtain the control of the asset.

It is sometimes the case that an entity purchases an asset from a manufacturer or a dealer (e.g. because it has significant trade discounts), and then the asset is immediately sold to a lessor and leased back by the entity that originally purchased the asset from a manufacturer/dealer. The legal form of such a transaction does not determine the accounting treatment. If the seller-lessee did not control the asset before it was transferred to the lessor, the whole transaction is not accounted for a sale and leaseback, but as a regular lease (IFRS 16.B45-B47).

The assessment of whether an entity controlled the asset before it was transferred to a lessor can be made based on paragraph IFRS 15.33. Usually, in transactions structured as described above, the entity buying the asset from a manufacturer or a dealer does not control the asset and such a transaction is accounted for as a regular lease.

When the transfer of the asset is a sale, a seller-lessee measures the right-of-use asset arising from the leaseback at the proportion of the previous carrying amount of the asset that relates to the right of use retained by the seller-lessee (IFRS 16.100a). Gain or loss is recognised only at the amount that relates to the rights transferred to the buyer-lessor. See paragraphs IFRS 16.BC266-BC267 for more discussion and Example 24 accompanying IFRS 16.

When the transfer of the asset is a sale, the buyer-lessor accounts for the purchase of an asset according to applicable IFRS (e.g. IAS 2, IAS 16, IAS 38) and accounts for the lease using lease requirements included in IFRS 16 (IFRS 16.100(b)).

If the fair value of the consideration for the sale of the asset is different from the fair value of the asset, or if the payments for the lease are not at market rates, an entity makes the following adjustments (IFRS 16.101):

  • consideration for the sale of the asset is recognised at fair value
  • any below-market terms are treated as a prepayment of lease payments
  • any above-market terms are treated as additional financing provided by the buyer-lessor to the seller-lessee

The adjustment described above is measured on the basis of the more readily determinable of 1/ the difference between the fair value of the consideration for the sale and the fair value of the asset or 2/ the difference between the present value of the contractual payments for the lease and the present value of payments for the lease at market rates (IFRS 16.102).

See Example 24 accompanying IFRS 16.

When the transfer of the asset is not a sale under IFRS 15 requirements, seller-lessee and buyer-lessor recognise a financial liability and financial asset under IFRS 9, respectively. The underlying asset remains in the statement of financial position of the seller-lessee all the time.

Right-of-use assets and lease liabilities are presented separately in the statement of financial position or are disclosed in the notes. If the right-of-use assets are not presented separately, they should be included in the same line as is suitable for the underlying assets (IFRS 16.47-48).

Depreciation charge for the right-of-use asset is presented the same way as depreciation/ amortisation of assets accounted for under IAS 16/IAS 38. IFRS 16 does not require separate presentation of depreciation of right-of-use assets.

Interest expense on the lease liability should be included in finance costs (IFRS 16.49).

Leases impact the statement of cash flows in the following way (IFRS 16.50):

  • repayments of the principal portion of the lease liability are presented within financing activities
  • payments relating to accrued interest are classified according to the policy choice for interest payments
  • short-term lease payments and payments for leases of low-value assets are presented within operating activities when the lessee adopted a relevant recognition exemption
  • variable lease payments not included in the measurement of the lease liability are presented within operating activities

Disclosure requirements for lessees are set out in paragraphs IFRS 16.51-60 and IFRS 16.B48-B52. Interestingly, lessees should gather all information about their leases in a single note or separate section in its financial statements, although cross-referencing is allowed (IFRS 16.52).

See also Examples 22 and 23 accompanying IFRS 16.

See other pages relating to IFRS 16:

IFRS 16 Leases: Scope of IFRS 16

IFRS 16 Leases: Identifying a Lease

IFRS 16 Leases: Lease Term

IFRS 16 Leases: Lessor accounting

IFRS 16 Leases: Transition from IAS 17 to IFRS 16

 


© 2018-2019 Marek Muc

Excerpts from IFRS Standards come from the Official Journal of the European Union (© European Union, https://eur-lex.europa.eu). The information provided on this website does not constitute professional advice and should not be used as a substitute for consultation with a certified accountant.